11 6 / 2014

"First forget inspiration. Habit is more dependable. Habit will sustain you whether you’re inspired or not. Habit will help you finish and polish your stories. Inspiration won’t. Habit is persistence in practice."

Octavia E. Butler; Bloodchild and Other Stories (via writingweasels)

(Source: wordpainting, via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

29 5 / 2014

Anonymous said: Hello! So I am absolutely terrible at arguing, but my OC is not supposed to be. He is way more persuasive and clever than I am, and he can easily win a debate, so how can I RP someone who is far above my level? I'm afraid of writing weak arguments that will make him look stupid.

It’s actually really easy to be good at arguments and debates, especially if you’re in an rp setting and can make shit up. :D Here are some personal tips from me on how to construct an argument. Remember the PEA! Point, evidence, analysis. Before constructing any argument, try to know what your point is. Try to write a topic sentence, as concise as possible, like “The Avengers will kick the X-Men ass in a battle located in New York City”. Evidence! Try to have at least three pieces of evidence possible in order to back up your point, and always analyze this evidence afterwards. “Because The Avengers have Captain America” Evidence! “Who really has a nice ass and no one can beat his ass cause he has the best one, duh!” Analysis! “Because Wolverine will totally help the Avengers. As seen in graphic novel blah blah blah, Wolverine’s loyalty lies with the Avengers and not with the X-Men.” That’s basically how I would do it in any sort of essay writing slash pseudo debate scenario. 

Here are some links to help you with constructing arguments:

Depending on how you want to play your character, there are a lot of ways to be persuasive. Your character can be more intellectual, coming up with good points to persuade someone to do good. Or, your character can be cunning and achieve it through subtle psychological hints and body language. For example, if you’re drinking with someone, every time that person laugh, by taking a drink you can make them associate the happy and free feeling of being drunk with you. So they naturally listen to you more. Obviously, that’s really sneaky, so it’s up to your character traits on whether that would be included. All persuasive characters have one thing in common and that’s confidence. So as the writer, you have to be confident in what your character’s motivations are. Be sure that you know why your character is persuading someone to do as such. Is it because they always want to be right? Or, is it because they are more manipulative?

Here are some links to help:

And for playing someone more clever than you are, google helps. Really. I’m currently playing an electrical engineer and I have no idea how to even begin. But it’s always about the research. When a specific topic comes up like, building a tiny robot camera, I google how to build a robot camera. It’s legitimately all I do for every character. When I roleplay Hawkeye, I think I had thirty tabs open at one point telling me how to shoot an arrow and how to calculate wind direction affecting said arrow. So you know, bullshit a little bit, and google a little bit. Throw really long words at your roleplayer and it’s all good. 

Here are some links:

Hope that helps!

15 5 / 2014

07 5 / 2014

"Treat all of your secondary characters like they think the book is about them."

Jocelyn Hughes (via miggylol)

(Source: maxkirin, via cosimuhs)

06 5 / 2014

"You have to know human behaviour … And the quality of your writing is absolutely capped at your understanding of human behaviour. You’ll never write above what you know about people."

Tony Gilroy (BAFTA/BFI Screenwriters Lecture)

(Source: jamesgrantbrown, via marykatewiles)

17 4 / 2014

"Writing is hard work. A clear sentence is no accident. Very few sentences come out right the first time, or even the third time. Remember this in moments of despair. If you find that writing is hard, it’s because it is hard. It’s one of the hardest things that people do."

William Zinsser (via writingquotes)

(via mistreeus)

09 4 / 2014

featherfall:

chaiivee:

i can’t make the words do the thing

the most perfect description of writers block.

06 4 / 2014

fadeintocase:

naughtyornicechekov:

amandaonwriting:

Suggestions for changing paragraphs

Oh my FuckinDo you realize how annoying it is when you don’t switch paragraphs when a new character is speakingDo you realize how confusing it isI don’t care if they’re using one-word responses at each other, start a new damn paragraph. ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVE MORE THAN ONE CHARACTER.

dear christ this.no more walls of text please. please.

fadeintocase:

naughtyornicechekov:

amandaonwriting:

Suggestions for changing paragraphs

Oh my Fuckin
Do you realize how annoying it is when you don’t switch paragraphs when a new character is speaking
Do you realize how confusing it is
I don’t care if they’re using one-word responses at each other, start a new damn paragraph.
ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVE MORE THAN ONE CHARACTER.

dear christ this.
no more walls of text please. please.

(via suspended-ina-sunbeam)

02 4 / 2014

02 4 / 2014

nauarcha:

The HIMYM finale taught me an important lesson as a writer
Endings are sometimes what I write first, they’re often the easiest part to write
But stories grow, evolve, and change, especially if you have complex, “living” characters that are growing and changing too, and sometimes an ending isn’t going to fit with the way things happen
The solution is to rewrite the ending, not try to shoehorn it in just because you wrote the ending first
Thanks for that, I guess.